Category Archives: fashion

Jennifer Lawrence responds to 'sexist' dress criticism: 'It was my choice'

The actor criticized media outlets for ‘ridiculous’ comments about an outfit she wore during the press tour for her latest film

Jennifer Lawrence has criticized “sexist” media coverage of her fashion choices in a new Facebook post.

The Oscar-winning actor, currently on a press tour for thriller Red Sparrow, responded to comments suggesting that the sleeveless Versace outfit worn during a photocall in London implied that she was being mistreated alongside her coat-wearing male co-stars.

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Source: gad

Gay men are winning this year’s Winter Olympics – and making it a joy to watch

Eric Radford is the first voluntarily out gay man to win a gold medal, while Adam Rippon and Gus Kenworthy have achieved other firsts on the slopes

You mentioned London fashion week last week, but have totally ignored the major cultural event happening right now. What have we learned from the Winter Olympics?

James, by email

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Source: gad

Anti-fur protests set to fly as activists target London fashion week

Animal rights campaigners plan largest demonstrations in decade as designers move away from fur

Boosted by the vogue for veganism, animal rights activists plan to target London fashion week this weekend with the largest fur protests seen at the event in a decade. Ed Winters, the co-director of Surge, which orchestrated anti-fur demonstrations that attractedmore than 250 people in September, a rise from 120 the previous catwalk season and 25 in September 2016, said “we expect those numbers to continually rise” .

There is, however, unlikely to be much fur on the catwalks. Over 90% of designers taking part in LFW have confirmed to the British Fashion Council (BFC) that they will not be using fur. But research by the University of Copenhagen reports retail sales of fur in the UK in 2016 were £162m, up 350% from 2011, as inexpensive real fur has become commonplace in fast fashion.

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Source: gad

'The anti-Trump': New Zealand PM Jacinda Ardern earns nickname from Vogue

The fashion bible hails the fledgling leader’s ‘fearlessness’ in a gushing profile backed up by a high-fashion photo shoot

The prime minister of New Zealand may have a new nickname on the international stage – “the anti-Trump”.

Related: Jacinda Ardern: ‘I’m not going to leave any room for doubt that I can do this’

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Source: gad

Are high heels back? No, it’s just London fashion week

Heels were once de rigueur, but most women have grown wise to their sciatica-inducing folly – except, that is, for fashion editors

I see London fashion week is about to start again. What strange sights can we expect to see?
John, London

Heels. High heels, John, and lots of ’em. What, on the runway? I don’t know, maybe? How would I know what will be on the runways? This ain’t Mystic Meg, bucko. No, I meant on the pavement.

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Source: gad

Bad science or expensive con: either way, I’m sticking with my skincare regime | Hadley Freeman

My skincare ritual is the closest I get to religion these days

Skincare relaxes me but makeup stresses me out. There is a simple reason for this: I am bad at makeup. I am so bad at makeup that even on my most hungover, jetlagged, puffy-eyed-from-cry-watching-Steel-Magnolias-and-drinking-gin-the-night-before days, I look better than I do on my best nights out wearing makeup. I was so excited when I bought one of those Charlotte Tilbury eyeshadow palettes because, a friend told me, “even an idiot can do a smoky eye with these”. Idiot-proof smoky eyes!

I gazed upon my palette like the Nazis in Indiana Jones And The Raiders Of The Lost Ark looking at a religious relic. Alas, this holy find had about as beneficial an effect on my face as the Ark did on the Nazis, whose faces melted like wax when they looked within.

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Source: gad

New York fashion week: industry faces its #MeToo moment

The hotly debated issue will not be hemlines but whether fashion is truly addressing its problems

The most public moment in the fashion industry calendar has arrived at a moment when the industry is in turmoil. The Bottega Veneta catwalk show, held at the American Stock Exchange on Friday night, opened New York fashion week just three weeks after Mario Testino and Bruce Weber, two of the most powerful photographers in the American fashion industry and front row regulars, faced multiple allegations of sexual misconduct, which they have denied. The most hotly debated issues of this week will not be hemlines, but whether an industry facing its own #MeToo moment can retain its dignity in the oversexed and underdressed environment of fashion week.

The blackout on the Golden Globes red carpet, when actresses wore black as a statement of feminist solidarity, proved the power of fashion as a lever to engineer change. Last week it was announced that the Baftas, which will be held during London fashion week, would have the same dress code. Yet internally, the fashion industry is proving slow to embrace the collective mood of reflection and re-evaluation that the red carpet blackouts signify in the film community. While Condé Nast International and major brands have cut ties with the named photographers for the foreseeable future, a root-and-branch overhaul of an industry that the Vogue cover girl Edie Campbell described in an open letter to Womenswear Daily as “too accepting of abuse in all its manifestations” has not been instigated. “The ritual humiliation of models, belittling of assistants, power plays and screaming fits … we have come to see this as part of the job,” wrote Campbell.

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Source: gad

‘I don’t think elegance is relevant’: Vetements’ Demna Gvasalia, the world’s hottest designer

The 36-year-old Georgian, now Balenciaga’s creative director, is bored of fashion as fantasy and has eschewed the tropes of Parisian glamour for flea market catwalks and crumpled styling. Where can he go next?

To understand what makes Demna Gvasalia the hottest designer in Paris right now, you first need to forget everything you think you know about Paris. Forget Catherine Deneuve, forget Jane Birkin, forget Françoise Hardy. Forget trenchcoats, silk blouses, ballet pumps and straw baskets. Forget Amélie in Montmartre and Carrie Bradshaw in Ladurée.

The Paris of Gvasalia, designer of Vetements and Balenciaga, is not that Paris. Instead, it is the Paris you might recognise if you were gripped by the latest series of gritty French police drama Spiral. It is the city we glimpse through the eyes of Louise, the nanny in Leïla Slimani’s novel Lullaby, when she makes the after-work journey from her employers’ chic 10th arrondissement home to her down-at-heel neighbourhood. It is a city of phone shops and fast food, a city where glamour means tight jeans and fake handbags, a city where background noise is a different language on every street corner, not a harmonious Édith Piaf soundtrack.

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Source: gad

Eco-chic and trouser suits: how Meghan Markle’s style reads the room

The future royal wore a trouser suit for her first official evening engagement with Prince Harry, ushering in a new kind of sartorial diplomacy

Last night, for her first official evening engagement with Prince Harry, Meghan Markle wore an Alexander McQueen trouser suit. It was slim-fitting, with cropped cigarette trousers, worn with very high stiletto heels and a cream dishabille blouse. The outfit was many things: very Saint Laurent’s Le Smoking, a bit Princess Diana, with a soupçon of Marlene Dietrich, even a hint of Carine Roitfeld (although Roitfeld probably wouldn’t have worn a blouse underneath the tux). What it was not was a Sandringham-appropriate boxy Catherine Walker skirt suit. It was notable because it didn’t feel like standard royal family dressing at all.

The royal family wrote the rule book on sartorial diplomacy. Usually, their approach is unambiguous. It is a gown embroidered with 2,091 shamrocks in Ireland; a Chanel tweed coat in Paris in the middle of Brexit; a dress by Polish designer Gosia Baczyńska at a garden party in Warsaw. It is the opposite of wearing a cult band T-shirt that only fellow devotees will recognise. The clothes are designed to speak of decency and propriety; the visual messages are clear enough to charm heads of state and reach the rest of us in the cheap seats as well.

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Source: gad