Category Archives: Fashion weeks

Anti-fur protests set to fly as activists target London fashion week

Animal rights campaigners plan largest demonstrations in decade as designers move away from fur

Boosted by the vogue for veganism, animal rights activists plan to target London fashion week this weekend with the largest fur protests seen at the event in a decade. Ed Winters, the co-director of Surge, which orchestrated anti-fur demonstrations that attractedmore than 250 people in September, a rise from 120 the previous catwalk season and 25 in September 2016, said “we expect those numbers to continually rise” .

There is, however, unlikely to be much fur on the catwalks. Over 90% of designers taking part in LFW have confirmed to the British Fashion Council (BFC) that they will not be using fur. But research by the University of Copenhagen reports retail sales of fur in the UK in 2016 were £162m, up 350% from 2011, as inexpensive real fur has become commonplace in fast fashion.

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Are high heels back? No, it’s just London fashion week

Heels were once de rigueur, but most women have grown wise to their sciatica-inducing folly – except, that is, for fashion editors

I see London fashion week is about to start again. What strange sights can we expect to see?
John, London

Heels. High heels, John, and lots of ’em. What, on the runway? I don’t know, maybe? How would I know what will be on the runways? This ain’t Mystic Meg, bucko. No, I meant on the pavement.

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New York fashion week: industry faces its #MeToo moment

The hotly debated issue will not be hemlines but whether fashion is truly addressing its problems

The most public moment in the fashion industry calendar has arrived at a moment when the industry is in turmoil. The Bottega Veneta catwalk show, held at the American Stock Exchange on Friday night, opened New York fashion week just three weeks after Mario Testino and Bruce Weber, two of the most powerful photographers in the American fashion industry and front row regulars, faced multiple allegations of sexual misconduct, which they have denied. The most hotly debated issues of this week will not be hemlines, but whether an industry facing its own #MeToo moment can retain its dignity in the oversexed and underdressed environment of fashion week.

The blackout on the Golden Globes red carpet, when actresses wore black as a statement of feminist solidarity, proved the power of fashion as a lever to engineer change. Last week it was announced that the Baftas, which will be held during London fashion week, would have the same dress code. Yet internally, the fashion industry is proving slow to embrace the collective mood of reflection and re-evaluation that the red carpet blackouts signify in the film community. While Condé Nast International and major brands have cut ties with the named photographers for the foreseeable future, a root-and-branch overhaul of an industry that the Vogue cover girl Edie Campbell described in an open letter to Womenswear Daily as “too accepting of abuse in all its manifestations” has not been instigated. “The ritual humiliation of models, belittling of assistants, power plays and screaming fits … we have come to see this as part of the job,” wrote Campbell.

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Dior Homme looks to win over the millennial market at Paris show

Robert Pattinson draws shrieks and Bella Hadid turns up in the brand’s new squidgy trainers

Hundreds of teenagers jostled outside the Grand Palais in Paris on Saturday morning, and they weren’t there for the Irving Penn retrospective. The object of their fascination was Robert Pattinson, whose arrival at the Dior Homme fashion show drew shrieks from the crowd.

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'Dressing in haste': Galliano delivers his first menswear collection for Margiela

Designer’s bright and optimistic vision dominates the Paris show

John Galliano’s first menswear collection for Maison Margiela opened with a red and black double-breasted overcoat worn with black, spongy slippers. It closed with a white shredded mackintosh over beige muslin underpants. In between, there were plastic sandals which clonked along the catwalk like ski boots, and several of Margiela’s famous split-toed high-heeled tabi boots and a bright yellow padded jacket, blown up like a pufferfish, paired with a sober midi-length skirt.

According to notes distributed at the show, the theme was “dressing in haste”. The idea was to merge “past and present house ideas into one forward proposal for a new kind of glamour”.

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Prada’s Milan menswear show is all about nylon on an industrial scale

It wasn’t quite a greatest hits but Miuccia Prada’s fans would recognise the much-loved prints, lipsticks and cagoules

Prada’s Instagram tagline reads “thinking fashion since 1913” and there’s little doubt that Miuccia Prada is still responsible for many of fashion’s big ideas. This means every detail in a Prada show, such as a change invenue, matters.

Rather than the usual venue at the back of the company’s HQ, where the show has been held for decades, the autumn/winter Prada menswear 2018 show on Sunday night took place in the warehouse behind the Fondazione Prada, the gallery the brand opened in 1995.

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Vivienne Westwood gets political at London fashion week men’s

Army hues, structured jackets and camouflage print take centre stage in Westwood and Craig Green’s collections

With Vivienne Westwood and Craig Green two of the biggest names on Monday’s schedule, the last day of London fashion week men’s was guaranteed to be a celebration of unfettered British creativity.

A typical Vivienne Westwood show is reactive and often at odds with the rest of the fashion week, and this collection was no different. First of all, there was no show. Instead viewers watched a two-minute and 45-second film shot largely at night or backstage starring character models, Westwood, an EU flag and some sandbags.

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Source: gad