Category Archives: Ethics

Is the Illuminati running the world? Maybe it’s not such a mad idea | Julian Baggini

Questioning the hidden power of elites – whether big pharma or secret societies – is really quite sane

If the Illuminati is real, it’s got to be the least secret secret society in the universe. It’s so bad at keeping itself hidden that its existence is proclaimed all over the internet by people whose investigative toolkit consists entirely of Google and a lively imagination.

The most recent would-be whistleblower, however, is far from your usual ex-sports commentator. Paul Hellyer, a former Canadian minister of defence, has blamed the Illuminati for suppressing technology brought to Earth by aliens that could end our reliance on fossil fuels.

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Source: gad

As technology develops, so must journalists’ codes of ethics | Paul Chadwick

AI is sure to bring many benefits but concerns over its ability to make decisions mean human journalists’ input remains vital

Journalism is largely collaboration: reporters with sources, writers and editors, lawyers advising publishers, producers with distributors, and audiences feeding back their knowledge. Rapid development of artificial intelligence means journalists are likely to collaborate more and more with machines that think. The word itself, machines, feels so industrial era, but “robots” feels too limited. Humans are busy building brains, if not yet minds. So my shorthand for now is AI.

Related: The real risks of artificial intelligence

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Source: gad

The sun may never set on British misconceptions about our empire | Ian Jack

An Oxford don wants Britons to stop feeling guilty about colonialism. But evidence suggests it already inspires more pride than shame

What did we learn about the British empire at school? In my case, which is the case for a generation born just before the empire’s long collapse, nothing very much. My parents and elder brother knew from their schooling about the battles of Arcot and Plassey and the lives of Robert Clive and General Gordon of Khartoum; but though I was aware of these people and events, from family conversations and old books that lay around the house, I was never formally taught about them.

At school in Scotland, we got the Tudors and the Stuarts, Turnip Townshend and the spinning jenny, and endless weeks of the Franco-Prussian war. Though the empire lived among us in the form of tea chests, “IND. IMP.” (Indiae Imperator, or emperor of India) on coins bearing the late king’s head, and steam locomotive names (Union of South Africa, Trinidad and Tobago), these never found their linking narrative in the classroom.

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Source: gad