Category Archives: Education

Game on: it’s never too early to teach children about money

Experts believe that how we handle finances is shaped by the age of seven – and board games and apps can help

The cost of a mortgage or rents, meeting monthly utility bills, shelling out for a new car – all headaches most people get to worry about from their 20s. But while some may struggle to pay their bills after a few too many nights out at the start of the month, others will have a tightly followed plan for their repayments.

So what is the difference between the savvy saver and the more knee-jerk spender?

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Source: gadt

Private school teacher banned for using racist language

Philip Pedley told history student at Oundle School they should be put ‘on the next boat’

A teacher at a private school in Northamptonshire has been banned from teaching after repeatedly using racist language about students.

A professional conduct panel found that Philip Pedley, a history teacher at Oundle school, where fees can be more than £35,000 a year, told colleagues he did not “want to teach blackies and chinkies in my classroom” and told one pupil “your father must have come over, stealing our jobs”.

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Source: gad

Boomerang offspring damage parents' wellbeing, study finds

Grown-up children who move back home worsen parents’ quality of life, research suggests

Grown-up children who return to the family home after a period away, often at university, cause a significant decline in their parents’ quality of life and wellbeing, according to a revealing report which explores for the first time the impact of the so-called “boomerang generation” on family life in Europe.

The study by the London School of Economics (LSE) shows that after decades of growing independence among young adults and a dramatic decline in intergenerational co-residence, the trend is now shifting in the other direction.

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Source: gad

Oxford University blocks staff attempts to challenge pension cuts

Arcane procedures used to halt move to debate proposals that sparked universities strike

The University of Oxford has blocked attempts by staff to debate pension proposals that have sparked industrial action on campuses across the UK, to cries of “Shame!” from academics.

As the strike by members of the University and College Union (UCU) entered its eighth day, Oxford’s arcane procedures were used to halts efforts to force a resolution on the proposals to downgrade staff pensions that have provoked action at more than 60 campuses.

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Source: gad

Dolly Parton gives 100 millionth free book to children

The country star’s Imagination Library initiative, set up as a tribute to her illiterate father, reaches major milestone

Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library, the initiative she set up in honour of her illiterate father, has handed out its 100 millionth free book.

The book, a copy of Parton’s children’s picture book Coat of Many Colors, was donated to the Library of Congress in Washington DC, with which Parton has set up a partnership to live-stream story readings.

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Source: gad

Have we reached peak English in the world? | Nicholas Ostler

One of Britain’s greatest strengths is set to diminish as China asserts itself on the world stage

In China last month, Theresa May attended the launch of the British Council’s English is Great campaign, intended to boost interest and fluency in our national language. This might sound like Donald Trump’s notorious “Make America great again”, but comes in fact from a stronger position. Beyond doubt, the use of English is greater than ever, and far more widespread than any other language in the world. All non-English-speaking powers of our globalised world recognise it as the first foreign language to learn; it is also, uniquely, in practical use worldwide. The British Council reckons that English is spoken at a useful level by some 1.75 billion people, a quarter of the world’s population. It is taught from primary level up in all China’s schools; it is the working language of the whole European Union.

Related: Inside the OED: can the world’s biggest dictionary survive the internet?

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Source: gad

The Guardian view on Neanderthals: we were not alone | Editorial

The first human contact with another intelligent species is a staple of science fiction, but we now know it happened 40,000 years ago

The three human subspecies known to have hybridised to produce the present human population of the planet, Neanderthals, Homo sapiens and Denisovans, last had a common ancestor more than half a million years ago. Until now it has been assumed that the only branch of her descendants to think symbolically was us, Homo sapiens. In fact, until the development of sequencing techniques sensitive enough to work on ancient DNA, it was thought that the other two species had died out entirely, rather than leaving portions of their genome in European and Melanesian populations respectively. But the discovery, reported last week, of palaeolithic art at four sites in Spain that dates from the time when the peninsula was occupied only by Neanderthals, shows that they worked with symbols of stone and paint.

We have no idea what these markings mean. That is in the nature of symbolism, and indeed of language: the meaning of a sound, or a marking on the wall, is given by the community that uses it; it can’t be read by outsiders. We already know that Neanderthals were anatomically equipped for speech; their use of painted symbols suggests that they could make audible symbols and not just visible ones.

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Source: gad

Children struggle to hold pencils due to too much tech, doctors say

Children need opportunities to develop hand strength and dexterity needed to hold pencils

Children are increasingly finding it hard to hold pens and pencils because of an excessive use of technology, senior paediatric doctors have warned.

An overuse of touchscreen phones and tablets is preventing children’s finger muscles from developing sufficiently to enable them to hold a pencil correctly, they say.

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Source: gad