Category Archives: Dolores O’Riordan

Fans pay tribute to Dolores O’Riordan in Limerick

Thousands gather at St Joseph’s Church to pay their respects to Irish pop star and Cranberries lead singer

Thousands have gathered in Limerick to remember the life of the Cranberries frontwoman Dolores O’Riordan, who died last week in London.

Fans young and old, many clutching white roses and daffodils, streamed into St Joseph’s church in the city for a public reposal on Sunday.

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Source: gad

Dolores O’Riordan obituary

Lead singer of the Cranberries whose startling, steely voice enchanted audiences on hits such as Linger and Zombie

‘I have a lot of secrets about my childhood [but they] are just for me,” Dolores O’Riordan told the Guardian in 1995. She and her Limerick rock quartet, the Cranberries, were then at the peak of their success, well on the way to selling 40m albums, and O’Riordan was one of the highest profile female singers in the English-speaking world. It was nearly 20 years later that she revealed that she had been abused for four years from the age of eight by someone close to her family. By her own account, O’Riordan, who has died aged 46 of a cause as yet unknown, spent most of her adult life seeking a balance between depression and anorexia, and the rewards of great professional success.

Related: Cranberries singer Dolores O’Riordan – a life in pictures

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Dolores O’Riordan death not suspicious, say police

Met police issue statement about Cranberries singer, who died in London on Monday

The death of the Cranberries singer Dolores O’Riordan is not being treated as suspicious, Scotland Yard has said.

The Irish performer was found dead at a hotel in London’s Park Lane on Monday morning. She had been in the capital to record a cover of Zombie, one of her group’s biggest hits, with hard rockers Bad Wolves.

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Dolores O’Riordan: anguished 90s star whose voice lingers on

The Cranberries’ singer faced down tremendous darkness, but her vocal lines could still have the lightest of touches

The rise of the Cranberries to vast success in the US was greeted with a degree of bemusement in the UK music press. It was 1993, a year in which Suede’s debut album, the Boo Radleys’ expansive Giant Steps and Blur’s Britpop-presaging Modern Life is Rubbish figured heavily in most British publications’ best-of polls. Why, out of all the up and coming guitar bands attempting to break the States, had Americans latched onto the Limerick quartet?

They were, after all, viewed as a very minor concern in the UK. Their 1991 debut EP Uncertain had attracted some attention – it was ethereal and experimental in a way that nothing else the Cranberries recorded would be, the spectral guitar textures, feedback and echo-laden vocals of Them suggesting they were cut from similar cloth to shoegazing bands like Slowdive or Chapterhouse. But then they had signed to a major label and made a far more straightforward-sounding debut album, Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can’t We?, which had more or less vanished without trace on release. To compound the bafflement, the Cranberries had been championed by American MTV while touring second on the bill to Suede, then very much considered the dernier cri in British alternative rock: why on earth had they been overlooked in favour of their support act?

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Source: gad