Category Archives: Design

War and pleas: propaganda posters from 20th century Australia – in pictures

Posters played a crucial role in the wars of the 20th century, firing up patriotic sentiment and sending out calls to arms. The exhibition Propaganda draws on the Australian War Memorial’s extensive collection, showing how illustration and graphic design were used to speak directly to people during times of conflict

Propaganda runs at the Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery 20 April – 8 July

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Source: gad

Soviet film posters of the 50s and 60s – in pictures

After the break-up of the USSR in 1991, many artefacts associated with Soviet life – from posters to gadgets – were discarded, destined to be forgotten. Founded in 2012, the Moscow Design Museum collects objects from the era, which form the basis of a new book, Designed in the USSR: 1950-1989 (Phaidon, £24.95). These film posters, made between 1957 and 1966, roughly coincide with the “Khrushchev thaw”, a period of increased liberalism that followed Stalin’s death. “They reflect their time well,” says the museum’s director, Alexandra Sankova. “At that time, design had an artistic expressiveness that reflected the thaw and dreams of a new, more open world.” Romance films and murder mysteries were popular, but “Soviet people loved comedies the most – they became classics of the genre. People still know them by heart.”

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I Heart Posters: the graphic design of Milton Glaser – in pictures

Cave paintings, thinks Milton Glaser, are the earliest posters. “Those images create reactions today with the same potency they must have had when they were made. It’s extraordinary that this form of communication has existed all through history.” The celebrated US graphic designer – whose work includes the I Heart NY design – has created countless posters, 450 of which are collected in a new book.

Some have taken on a life of their own: “People send me the strangest examples of ‘I Heart’,” he says, “for example, in a hut in a small African village.” A good poster, he says, needs to communicate effectively, be persuasive, and attract attention. But there’s a distinction between graphic design and art: “graphic design is now basically an adjunct of capitalism. Art is a means of examining reality freshly with open eyes.”

Milton Glaser Posters (Abrams Books, £22.99) is published on 27 March. To order a copy for £19.54 go to guardianbookshop.com or call 0330 333 6846

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Polish film posters by legendary designer Andrzej Klimowski

Selected highlights from the Klimowski Poster Book, a new collection by the Anglo-Polish graphic artist, whose radical, eye-catching designs draw on 20th century art movements and his Eastern European heritage.

•Klimowski Poster Book is published on 8 March by SelfMadeHero

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Sixty years of great Australian design – in pictures

Since 1958, the Australian Good Design Awards have been handing out accolades for the best Australian products and designs. While some of the winners such as the black box flight recorder and the bionic ear changed the world, others, such as the Decor wine cask cooler, the Stackhat and the Victa lawnmower, are nostalgic reminders of domestic Australian life in the 1970s and 80s. Entries for this year’s awards close on 9 March and winners will be announced on 12 April

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North Korea’s graphic artistry – in pictures

Everyday objects, such as sweet wrappers and posters, will be exhibited for the first time outside the communist republic at a London show to showcase the country’s graphic art. Made in North Korea: Everyday Graphics from the DPRK is at the House of Illustration until 13 May

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Dead Space was to games what Alien was to movies

Now available free on PC, Dead Space came closer than any other game to replicating the look, feel and atmosphere of Ridley Scott’s sci-fi thriller

This week, Electronic Arts has made one of the most interesting and atmospheric narrative games of the 2000s available for free to users of its Origin gaming service. Released in 2008 and created by Californian studio Visceral Games, Dead Space remains a heady, often terrifying thrill ride and if you’ve never played it before, it’s worth taking this chance – especially if you’re a fan of the Alien movies.

Although there have been numerous attempts to bring Alien directly to video games – most successfully, Creative Assembly’s incredibly tense Alien: Isolation – it’s Dead Space that has got closest to replicating the look, feel and atmosphere of Ridley Scott’s original film.

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Source: gadt

The £3bn rebirth of King's Cross: dictator chic and pie-in-the-sky penthouses

Google HQ, boutique shops in old coal sheds, gasholders offering wedge-shaped flats at sky-high prices … as the vast project comes together after 18 years, our critic gives his verdict

The words “industrial luxury” are emblazoned on a window as you approach the cluster of majestic iron gasholders standing on the edge of the canal in King’s Cross. Built in the 1860s near St Pancras station, and dismantled in the 1990s when the station was expanded, the cast iron frames have now been reborn as the skeletal enclosures for three cylinders of luxury apartments – with prices beginning at £810,000 for a studio flat and rising, like the former gas tanks, into the many millions for a penthouse.

Industry and luxury are the two magic ingredients that have driven the £3bn redevelopment of King’s Cross in north London, tapping into the collective nostalgia for big brick sheds and the lure of a bit of bronze trim. Across 27 hectares of former railway lands, developer Argent has been piecing together a masterplan since 2000, employing 35 different architects to transform a gritty world of rails and warehouses into a polished vision of postindustrial regeneration. It is one of the biggest such projects in Europe and, despite the crass marketing slogans, it’s shaping up to be one of the best planned.

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'Already iconic': David Adjaye's black history museum wins design of the year

The British architect and four practices triumph for their bold addition to the Washington DC Mall, inspired by African sculpture and chronicling slave history. Is it a worthy winner?

Standing proudly on the Mall in Washington DC, looking like a shimmering bronze pagoda, the National Museum of African American History and Culture has been named design of the year 2017. It is only the second time in the award’s 10-year history that a building has taken the title, following on from Zaha Hadid’s 2014 win for the Heydar Aliev centre in Azerbaijan – a decision that sparked protest over allegations of forced evictions and human rights abuses.

This year’s winner – the work of four practices though often credited to Britain’s Sir David Adjaye, as he was the creative force behind its genesis – stands as a gleaming temple of abuses of a different kind. The museum’s emotionally charged basement charts the horrific treatment suffered by African Americans over the centuries, with leg irons, whipping posts and slave auction blocks graphically spotlit, as visitors are taken through the history of the struggle for racial equality, rising to the sunnier upper levels of funk, soul, hip-hop and contemporary art.

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Source: gad