Category Archives: Data protection

Price comparison site data may have been used by Leave.EU

Former Cambridge Analytica director told MPs Brexit campaign group may have used data from Moneysupermarket

Personal information gathered from price comparison websites may have been used without people’s knowledge or consent by pro-Brexit campaigners in the European referendum.

An ex-director of Cambridge Analytica told parliament last week that she believed the Leave.EU campaign, headed by Nigel Farage and bankrolled by Arron Banks, may have breached data protection laws by using people’s private information without consent. She said she had seen with her “own eyes” how Leave.EU had apparently targeted customers of Eldon Insurance – owned by Banks – using their private data to promote anti-Europe messaging.

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Source: gad

Arron Banks, the insurers and my strange data trail

Carole Cadwalladr just wanted to insure her car. Six months later, she found a mass of personal details held by a firm she had never contacted that is run by Leave.EU’s biggest donor, Arron Banks. How did it get there?

If a 29-year-old Peugeot 309 is the answer, it’s fair to wonder: what on earth is the question? In fact, I had no idea about either the question or the answer when I submitted a “subject access request” to Eldon Insurance Services in December last year. Or that my car – a vehicle that dates from the last millennium – could hold any sort of clue to anything. If there’s one thing I’ve learned, however, in pursuing the Cambridge Analytica scandal, it’s that however weird things look, they can always get weirder.

Because I was simply seeking information, as I have for the last 16-plus months, about what the Leave campaigns did during the referendum – specifically, what they did with data. And the subject access request – a legal mechanism I’d learned about from Paul-Olivier Dehaye, a Swiss mathematician and data expert – was a shot in the dark.

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Source: gadt

Google vs the right to be forgotten: Chips with Everything podcast

In April 2018, Google lost a landmark case against a businessman who used his ‘right to be forgotten’ to have links to a previous conviction taken down from the search engine. Jordan Erica Webber discusses the importance of this case and looks ahead at the coming era of General Data Protection Regulation

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We’ve all done things we regret. Perhaps you’re one of those people who lies awake at night fretting about something hurtful you said 10 years ago. Or maybe you committed a crime in your youth, served your time, reformed and are dedicated to a new life as a law-abiding citizen.

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Source: gadt

Americans want tougher rules for big tech amid privacy scandals, poll finds

After Cambridge Analytica revelations, 83% of Americans call for companies like Facebook to face harsher penalties for breaches

Americans want major technology companies to be regulated, with legal responsibility for the content they carry on their platforms and harsher punishment for breaches of data privacy, according to a nationally representative survey of 2,500 adults.

In the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, the way that technology companies handle our personal data and moderate the content – including fake news, hate speech and terrorist propaganda – on their platforms has been thrown under the microscope.

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Source: gadt

How Europe's 'breakthrough' privacy law takes on Facebook and Google

Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation is forcing big changes at tech’s biggest firms – even if the US isn’t likely to follow suit

Despite the political theatre of Mark Zuckerberg’s congressional interrogations last week, Facebook’s business model isn’t at any real risk from regulators in the US. In Europe, however, the looming General Data Protection Regulation will give people better privacy protections and force companies including Facebook to make sweeping changes to the way they collect data and consent from users – with huge fines for those who don’t comply.

“It’s changing the balance of power from the giant digital marketing companies to focus on the needs of individuals and democratic society,” said Jeffrey Chester, founder of the Center for Digital Democracy. “That’s an incredible breakthrough.”

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Source: gadt

Facebook to start asking permission for facial recognition in GDPR push

Users will be asked to review information about targeted advertising but some say opting out is deliberately difficult

Facebook has started to seek explicit consent from users for targeted advertising, storage of sensitive information, and – for the first time in the EU – application of facial recognition technology as the European general data protection regulation (GDPR) is due to come into force in just over a month.

The company is only required to seek the new permissions in the European Union, but it plans to roll them out to all Facebook users, no matter where they live. The move follows Mark Zuckerberg’s stated goal to apply the spirit of GDPR worldwide.

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Source: gadt

Five things we learned from Mark Zuckerberg's Facebook hearing

The CEO’s privacy is as vulnerable as ours, and the social network faces a regulation battle

His data was sold to a malicious third party as well, he confirmed, in an answer to a question from the Democratic representative Anna Eshoo.

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Source: gadt

GDPR: how can I email data securely to comply with the new regulations?

Robert is often required to email sensitive data. Is there a secure way of doing so in view of the new data protection laws?

As a freelance media professional, I am often asked by my various employers to send copies of my passport, completed visa forms and other sensitive data in the form of email attachments. I have recently questioned this and have not really got a satisfactory response. I have tried uploading these documents to my Google Drive account and giving them a link, though I don’t really know whether this method is any safer. However, I am at a loss to see how companies should acquire such sensitive data in light of the new GDPR rules coming into force in May. Robert

The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which comes into force on May 25, will govern the storage and processing of data rather than its collection. It also includes some very important consumer rights. The most important are the right to be informed, the right of access, the right to correct errors, the right to erase data, the right to restrict processing, and the right take it elsewhere (data portability). How useful these will be in practice remains to be seen.

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Source: gadt

'Getting naked before the white man': Indian minister rubbishes privacy fears

KJ Alphons says critics of country’s database have no issue complying with US visa requirements

An Indian cabinet minister has questioned why privacy advocates in the country have no issue “getting body naked before the white man” to obtain a US visa but object to the government’s biometric database scheme.

Revelations last week about Cambridge Analytica’s misuse of Facebook data have sparked a renewed debate in India about privacy in one of the world’s fastest-growing internet markets.

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Source: gad

Facebook logs texts and calls, users find as they delete accounts

Leaving the social network after Cambridge Analytica scandal, users discover extent of data held

As users continue to delete their Facebook accounts in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, a number are discovering that the social network holds far more data about them than they expected, including complete logs of incoming and outgoing calls and SMS messages.

The #deletefacebook movement took off after the revelations that Facebook had shared with a Cambridge psychologist the personal information of 50 million users, without their explicit consent, which later ended up in the hands of the election consultancy Cambridge Analytica.

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Source: gadt