Category Archives: Cybercrime

Growth of AI could boost cybercrime and security threats, report warns

Experts say action must be taken to control artificial intelligence tech

Wanton proliferation of artificial intelligence technologies could enable new forms of cybercrime, political disruption and even physical attacks within five years, a group of 26 experts from around the world have warned.

In a new report, the academic, industry and the charitable sector experts, describe AI as a “dual use technology” with potential military and civilian uses, akin to nuclear power, explosives and hacking tools.

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Source: gadt

UK blames Russia for NotPetya cyber-attack last year

Defence secretary says Moscow ‘undermined democracy’ with attack that targeted Ukraine

The defence minister has accused the Russian government of “undermining democracy” with a cyber-attack that targeted Ukraine and spread across Europe last year.

The UK government took the unusual step of publicly accusing Moscow of the NotPetya ransomware attack in June, which primarily targeted the Ukrainian financial, energy and government sectors.

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Source: gadt

Cryptojacking attack hits Australian government websites

Hackers used plug-in to force computers to secretly mine cryptocurrency

A series of Australian government websites, including the Victorian parliament’s, have been compromised by malware that forces visitors’ computers to secretly mine cryptocurrency, as part of a worldwide security breach.

The process, known as cryptojacking, forces a user’s computer to mine cryptocurrency without their permission, generating profits for the hacker.

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Source: gadt

Government websites hit by cryptocurrency mining malware

Thousands of sites, including NHS services and the ICO, hijacked by rogue code

Thousands of websites, including those belonging to NHS services, the Student Loans Company and several English councils, have been infected by malware that forces visitors’ computers to mine cryptocurrency while using the site.

Late on Sunday, the website of the UK’s data protection watchdog, the Information Commissioner’s Office, was taken down to deal with the issue after it was reportedly infected by the malware.

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Source: gadt

Winter Olympics was hit by cyber-attack, officials confirm

South Koreans refuse to comment on rumours Russia was behind the action as revenge for doping ban

Winter Olympics officials have confirmed the games were hit by a cyber-attack during the opening ceremony – but have refused to confirm rumours in Pyeongchang that Russia was responsible.

Shortly before the ceremony, the official Pyeongchang 2018 site stopped working, with users unable to access information or print tickets for events. The website was only normalised at 8am on Saturday, 12 hours later.

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Source: gadt

Jackpotting: hackers are making ATMs give away cash

Two of world’s largest cash machine makers and US Secret Service warn of attacks that empty ATMs at rate of 40 notes per 20 seconds

Cybercriminals are hacking cash machines to force them to give out money in what is known as “jackpotting”, according to two of the world’s largest ATM makers and the US Secret Service.

Diebold Nixdorf and NCR sent out an alert to their customers over the weekend, but did not identify victims or specify how much money had been stolen. The US Secret Service started warning financial institutions that jackpotting was now a risk in the US last week, having started in Mexico last year, according to a confidental alert seen by Krebs on Security.

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Source: gadt

Cybercrime: £130bn stolen from consumers in 2017, report says

Of the 978m global victims of cybercrime last year, 17m were Britons targeted by phishing, ransomware, online fraud and hacking

Hackers stole a total of £130bn from consumers in 2017, including £4.6bn from British internet users, according to a new report from cybersecurity firm Norton.

More than 17 million Brits were hit by cybercrime in the past year, meaning the nation, which accounts for less than 1% of the global population, makes up almost 2% of the 978 million global victims of cybercrime and almost 4% of the global losses.

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Source: gadt

Cyber-attack on UK a matter of 'when, not if', says security chief

Exclusive: Ciaran Martin says Britain fortunate so far to avoid major, crippling attack

The head of the UK’s National Cyber Security Centre has warned that a major cyber-attack on the UK is a matter of “when, not if”, raising the prospect of devastating disruption to British elections and critical infrastructure.

In remarks underlining newly released figures showing the number of cyber-attacks on the UK in the last 15 months, Ciaran Martin said the UK had been fortunate to avoid a so-called category one (C1) attack, broadly defined as an attack that might cripple infrastructure such as energy supplies and the financial services sector.

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Source: gadt

Four ways to avoid being a victim of Russian cyberwarfare

Don’t be duped by a bot or phished like Hillary Clinton’s campaign – follow these four simple steps to outflank Putin’s digital foot soldiers

Russian cyberwarfare is the new threat to the nation, according to Nick Carter, the head of the British army, which means that the new frontline is, well, you. So it’s now more than just simple self-care to be smart about your online security – it’s your patriotic duty.

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Source: gadt

Will AT&T’s call to drop Huawei end phone maker’s US hopes?

Loss of the deal with the giant mobile carrier has put a huge obstacle in the way of the Chinese firm’s ambition of conquering the American market

Amid the glitz and glamour of the CES consumer electronics show in Las Vegas last week, one piece of news struck a particularly sour note for Chinese phone-maker Huawei. Despite months of preparation, the giant US mobile carrier AT&T announced last Monday that it was pulling out of a deal to sell Huawei’s smartphones.

The decision was taken as a result of political pressure on AT&T by American politicians, who had written to the telecoms regulator the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) – which must approve the sale of phones and other devices in the US – saying they had “long been concerned about Chinese espionage in general, and Huawei’s role in that espionage in particular”. Richard Yu, chief executive of Huawei’s consumer division, was obliged to go through the motions at CES of introducing his new Mate 10 phone, having seen planned marketing spending of $100m and assurances of no government interference turn to ashes.

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Source: gad2