Category Archives: Culture

Rampaging wage slaves and Marie Antoinette – the pick of avant-garde festival games

An edible board game and a trickster goose were among offerings at London’s Now Play This experimental games showcase

Now Play This is an exhibition of experimental game design and a regular feature of the annual London games festival. For this year’s Now Play This, at Somerset House earlier this month, exhibition director Holly Gramazio and digital curator George Buckenham spread a wide range of games – digital, physical, edible, musical – across the site’s indoor and outdoor spaces. Here are some of our favourites.

Lost Wage Rampage (Jane Friedhoff, Marlowe Dobbe, and Andy Wallace)

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Source: gadt

Rebel Wilson deserved right to reply before liar accusations published, court told

Actor’s barrister says Bauer had a campaign to ‘take down’ Wilson and attempted to ‘neutralise’ her responses
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Rebel Wilson deserved the right of reply before a magazine painted her as a serial liar, and an apology after the articles went to print, a Melbourne court has been told.

The Hollywood star sat through day two of a court of appeal hearing on Thursday as the publisher of Woman’s Day challenged supreme court of Victoria orders it must pay her $4.5m for defamation.

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Source: gad

The Leisure Seeker review – Mirren and Sutherland in syrupy heart-sinker

Helen Mirren and Donald Sutherland play lovable oldsters on a road trip, with soppy, insufferable results

Helen Mirren and Donald Sutherland take to the road in this soppy bittersweet heart-sinker – depressing in various intentional and unintentional ways. Lovably impulsive oldsters Ella and John infuriate their uptight children (played by Christian McKay and Janel Moloney) by heading off in their cranky old Winnebago for a last road trip in the sunset of their lives, despite their frailties. They are cheerful, gutsy, secretly scared of the future and by imminent revelations about their shared past.

It is an Italian production, directed by Paolo Virzì and co-written by Stephen Amidon, adapting the novel by Michael Zadoorian. (Virzì’s last film was the considerably more astringent, Italian-set Human Capital, an adaptation of Amidon’s novel.)

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Source: gad

Danny Fields' best photograph: the Ramones prowl round the US supreme court

‘Hey, it’s Washington! Let’s run around!’

I became the Ramones’ manager after seeing them at CBGB in New York. From the opening downstroke of the guitar, I loved them. When I met them afterwards, they asked if I would write about them. I said: “More than that, I want to manage you.” I started taking photos of them when they were making their first album. If the manager has done a good job there’s nothing to do once the band gets to the studio except let her bang, so I took a camera along, thinking I could record moments that might be considered candid. They realised that even if I took pictures of them drooling, I wasn’t going to use them – as their manager, I wasn’t going to do anything to damage their career.

What made them good to photograph was the same thing that made them good on stage: presentation. They were intuitive. The first time I saw them live, the presentation was perfect – the clothes, the hair, the architecture of the set. They knew how to do it and they’d figured it out themselves. They weren’t puppets. When rock’n’roll wants to come out, it comes out of every pore, and they had that.

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Source: gad

I Feel Pretty review – Amy Schumer's self-image comedy falls flat

As an insecure woman finding her place in a superficial world, the comedian’s considerable talents can’t save a subpar script

Amy Schumer’s sharp, occasionally hilarious, brand of comedy is reliant on a number of constants, one of the most defining of which is a frank, often brutal discussion of how she’s physically compared with other women. In her standup, she frequently mocks the vapidity of an industry that deems her abnormal while remaining confident and, despite some self-deprecation, secure about her appearance.

Related: Blockers review – prom night comedy as parents turn sex obstructors

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Source: gad

Stella McCartney: ‘Only 1% of clothing is recycled. What are we doing?’

The designer’s ethical stance made her a style outsider – but now the industry is finally catching up. Ahead of a new V&A show, she talks about reclaiming her name, the joy of nature and the trouble with fast fashion

Stella McCartney is a designer, a businesswoman and an environmental activist, but of the three, she says, fashion will always come first. “It has to, you see. Because the only way for me to start the conversation I want to start is by making a product that you want to buy and that you are going to spend your hard-earned money on. If the product is rubbish, then there is no conversation to be had. If I don’t have a successful business, then I’m an environmentalist who happens to be Paul McCartney’s daughter, and that is a conversation which lasts about three seconds. No one is going to come back for more of that chat.”

Early years

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Source: gad

Mercury 13: the untold story of women testing for spaceflight in the 1960s

In a new Netflix documentary, the tales of 13 female pilots who dreamed of becoming astronauts yet were denied the opportunity by Nasa are finally brought to light

When Neil Armstrong clambered down on to the surface of the moon, he famously declared that he had taken “one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind”.

But what if that one small step had been taken by a woman? What kind of leap would that have represented, at a time when the American public was waking up to women’s rights?

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Source: gad

The Split: Abi Morgan on how she blew the wig off the British legal drama

They wear sharp suits and power-walk to meetings with scandalous celebrity clients. But the solicitor sisters in this glamorous new divorce drama are not what they seem

‘The idea for the show came from three things,” says Abi Morgan. “I was coming up to 50 and, having spent two decades with the same man, was starting to think about 21st-century marriage and relationships. Then I met a mother who was a divorce lawyer and got talking to her about family law.”

The third angle derives from the fact that Morgan, the acclaimed writer behind The Hour and River, is herself a child of divorce, her parents having split when she was 11. “I was really interested in that legacy, how it can affect people in different ways.”

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Source: gad

Mad Max: will courtroom feuding put the brakes on a Fury Road sequel?

George Miller’s dystopian romp left audiences desperate for more. Yet even in a world teeming with unwanted follow-ups, we may not get it

George Lucas once argued that The Phantom Menace was the Star Wars movie he would have made back in the 1970s, had special effects technology been sufficiently advanced. With Mad Max: Fury Road, director George Miller took that concept – the turbo charged, high-end revamp – and managed to get it out of first gear.

Where The Phantom Menace had only the most ardent of Star Wars acolytes begging for more, few movies of recent years have left audiences wanting a sequel like Fury Road did, with its haul of $379m (£267m) at the global box office and six gongs at the Oscars. Miller has been happy to allow rumours to proliferate of at least two more episodes set in postapocalyptic Australia, not least the tantalising prospect of a Furiosa spin-off starring Charlize Theron as the one-armed feminist totem. But we have heard very little – beyond occasional rumblings about battles between Miller’s production company and Warner Bros studio over profits from the film – about when we might actually get to see them.

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Source: gad

The last town in Sovietland – in pictures

Up above the Arctic Circle, 40 hours by train from Moscow, sits the Russian city of Vorkuta. It was built by gulag inmates but was given purpose by the coal industry that used to be the region’s lifeblood. Now mining has disappeared, leaving many of its outposts abandoned. Tomeu Coll’s 2009 photo essay Nevermind Sovietland hauntingly records the lives of those who still live there

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Source: gad