Category Archives: Comedy

A Seinfeld revival? Here's what they need to do to get it right

Jerry Seinfield says ‘it’s possible’ a comeback could be on the cards. That would offer him the chance to right some wrongs and create the revival to top them all

Television in 2018 is a clutter of reboots and revivals, but Jerry Seinfeld has always managed to resist the allure of bringing back his beloved 1990s sitcom. That is, until now. Maybe. In an interview with Ellen DeGeneres on Tuesday, Seinfeld indicated a softening of his resolve, saying of a revival is “possible”.

Now, let’s not get excited here. A Seinfeld revival is possible, but only in the same way that the Queen of England developing a taste for human blood and going on a murderous rampage through the streets of London is possible. It is possible in the same way that it is possible for you to put your fist inside your mouth. Just because something is possible, it doesn’t make it likely, or desirable.

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Source: gad

Get Out triumphs at Writers Guild of America awards

Jordan Peele’s smash-hit horror film and the gay coming-of-age movie Call Me By Your Name take top prizes at Oscars bellwether

Get Out and Call Me By Your Name took the top prizes at the Writers Guild of America awards, in one of the final major awards-season bellwethers before next month’s Oscars.

Get Out, the smash-hit satirical horror written and directed by Jordan Peele, triumphed in the best original screenplay category, beating I, Tonya, Lady Bird, The Big Sick and current Oscar best picture favourite The Shape of Water. However, another best picture frontrunner, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, was ineligible at the WGAs because it did not meet the organisation’s signatory rules.

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Source: gad

Goodbye Lena Dunham! Why John Early is millennial comedy’s new king

From his hipster satire in Search Party to Britney Spears impressions, the Tennessee comic’s joyful characters mark a departure from self-absorbed twentysomething humour

In one of the final episodes of subversive murder mystery series Search Party, John Early’s fantastically vainglorious character Elliott has an epiphany. He sits at the desk of his book publisher and addresses a room of staff who are impatiently waiting for a first draft of his autobiography. “Here’s the truth. I don’t want to work. I don’t like working. Work sucks,” he declares after a long, meditative sigh. “Working feels bad and I don’t ever want to work one more day in my entire life. Oh my God, it feels so good to say that!” Combined with his ridiculously contrarian outfit – a gaudy striped smock, a cream Sherlock cap and a pair of patterned swimming trunks – Elliott exudes the much-examined “millennial malaise”. A man exhausted by life, by expectations. Even the prospect of a ghostwritten book about his own life is a cruel distraction from the relaxation he believes he is entitled to.

Early himself is far from the insolent fool he’s mastered so dexterously, even if the role was imagined by Search Party writers Sarah-Violet Bliss and Charles Rogers with him specifically in mind. Elliott follows a succession of perversely entertaining performances from the standup and actor: cut-throat, body-rolling, amateur thespian Logan in Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later; the emotionally fraught, control-freak dinner party host in Netflix’s The Characters; the string of surreal, fame-hungry outliers in his Vimeo series 555; his short but scene-stealing appearances in Broad City, High Maintenance, 30 Rock and Judd Apatow’s Love. At a time when so much modern comedy is overwhelmed by coy stillness and naturalism (the most high-profile and influential example being Girls), Early’s cameos are bursts of joyful, elastic facial expressions and elaborate dance moves, an energy that follows in the footsteps of Amy Poehler and Kristen Wiig. It is because of his fresh approach to humour that the cult online comic, and now ever burgeoning mainstream presence, ushers in a new era of TV comedy. He is a reaction against the drifting mood that has engulfed screens for the past decade, and is, as Esquire neatly put it, “comedy’s secret weapon”.

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Source: gad

Our Cartoon President review – Stephen Colbert's farce nails Trump drama

The animated show assumes a workplace comedy approach to the Trump White House to hilarious effect

Before watching the new animated series Our Cartoon President, I thought I’d come down with a serious case of Trump Satire Fatigue, or TSF. Everywhere we turn the president is getting roasted, deservedly so, by someone new: the late-night hosts, Saturday Night Live, American Horror Story, Michael Moore. At a certain point the race to save democracy via comedy becomes its own feedback loop, an indistinguishable glob of gags extracted from a man so lacking in subtext that the outrageous things he says are earnestly defended, by his handlers a day later, as jokes. Such is the profuse, and prosperous, state of political satire in 2018.

Related: The cartoon president – Trump has wielded power in comics for years

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Source: gad

Late-night hosts on State of the Union: 'This wasn't a night for facts'

Comics, including Stephen Colbert, Trevor Noah and Jimmy Kimmel, reacted to Trump’s first State of the Union address

Late-night hosts on Tuesday addressed Donald Trump’s first official State of the Union address.

“We are live right now, and barely conscious following a 90-minute speech,” said Stephen Colbert, whose show aired directly following Trump’s speech. “There were some bright spots. There were some really heartwarming moments. Some amazing people were there in the gallery.”

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Late-night hosts on SOTU: 'Trump thinks he gets to present the award for his favorite state'

Comics, including Stephen Colbert and Jimmy Kimmel, discussed Trump’s address and Hillary Clinton’s handling of a sexual harassment complaint

Late-night hosts on Monday discussed Trump’s state of the union address, Sean Hannity’s attempts not to cover unflattering news about the president, and a report about Hillary Clinton’s failure to fire a staffer accused of sexual harassment.

Related: As State of the Union nears, is America great again for the working class?

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SAG awards 2018: Three Billboards wins big in female-powered ceremony

Frances McDormand and Sam Rockwell win for roles in the small-town drama while an all-female list of presenters celebrate an important year for women in Hollywood

The cast of Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri won big at the 24th annual Screen Actors Guild awards during a female-powered ceremony.

Related: The 10 film performances that deserve more awards attention this year

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Step Sisters review – hits and misses in Netflix's cultural appropriation comedy

A feelgood narrative sits somewhat awkwardly alongside a topical yet disappointingly tepid story of race on campus

Before it was even released, there was swift pushback to the Netflix acquisition Step Sisters. Despite a formidable production team behind it that includes Dear White People writer Chuck Hayward and Master of None’s Lena Waithe, the premise struck the Twitter commentariat as trite and conservative: Jamilah, a college senior hoping to gain admission to Harvard Law School, is asked by a professor to rehabilitate a group of disgraced white sorority sisters by teaching them how to step, a style of percussive dance that has its roots in African foot dancing and black sorority life. If she can pull it off, and impart upon them lessons of unity and sisterhood, the sorority will be readmitted to campus (they were punished because a sister was caught having sex on school grounds) and Jamilah will get a coveted recommendation letter to Harvard.

Related: Master of None’s Lena Waithe: ‘If you come from a poor background, TV becomes what you dream about’

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Late-night TV hosts: 'Sometimes Trump is so stupid that it’s not even funny'

Comics, including Trevor Noah and Stephen Colbert, discuss Trump’s attempts to dismantle the visa lottery and his rumored affair

Late-night hosts discussed the week’s Fake News Awards and the president’s confused stance on immigration.

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Source: gad