Category Archives: Cancer

Stress does not cause cancer. But when I’m unhappy, I get ill | Christina Patterson

We should listen to experts such as Cancer Research, but I’m the expert on my heart – and its connection with my health

What starts with an “o”, has an “s” in the middle, and ends with death? If you like crosswords and puzzles, you’ll love the posters that have been springing up around the country in the last few days. They’re like the billboards in Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri. But the culprit in this murder mystery is you.

Related: Millennials set to be the fattest generation of Britons, research shows

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Source: gad

Half of Britons mistakenly believe stress causes cancer

Survey reveals widespread misconceptions about causes of disease, with 51% of people unaware of risk from eating processed meat

Half of Britons mistakenly think that stress can cause cancer, even though there is no evidence to support that belief, new findings show.

In a survey of the public’s knowledge of what does and does not cause cancer, exactly 50% of the representative sample of 2,070 adults said that stress increases cancer risk.

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Source: gad

Yes, bacon really is killing us

Decades of research proves that chemicals used to make bacon do cause cancer. So how did the meat industry convince us it was safe?

By Bee Wilson

There was a little cafe I used to go to that did the best bacon sandwiches. They came in a soft and pillowy white bap. The bacon, thick-cut from a local butcher, was midway between crispy and chewy. Ketchup and HP sauce were served in miniature jars with the sandwich, so you could dab on the exact amount you liked. That was all there was to it: just bread and bacon and sauce. Eating one of these sandwiches, as I did every few weeks, with a cup of strong coffee, felt like an uncomplicated pleasure.

And then, all of a sudden, the bacon sandwich stopped being quite so comforting. For a few weeks in October 2015, half the people I knew were talking about the news that eating bacon was now a proven cause of cancer. You couldn’t miss the story: it was splashed large in every newspaper and all over the web. As one journalist wrote in Wired, “Perhaps no two words together are more likely to set the internet aflame than BACON and CANCER.” The BBC website announced, matter-of-factly, that “Processed meats do cause cancer”, while the Sun went with “Banger out of Order” and “Killer in the Kitchen”.

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Source: gad

Irish author with terminal cancer reaches No 1 after campaign

Support from authors including Marian Keyes sees Emma Hannigan’s Letters to My Daughters become a bestseller, after she announces ‘all avenues have been exhausted’ in her treatment

Emma Hannigan’s Letters to My Daughters has shot to the top of book charts in Ireland, after the author announced that her cancer was now terminal, and her fellow writers launched a campaign to make her final novel a No 1 bestseller.

On Wednesday, official book sales monitor Nielsen said that Hannigan’s novel had sold 4,065 copies in the last week, making it Ireland’s bestselling title by some margin, ahead of the second-placed The Year That Changed Everything, by Cathy Kelly, which sold 1,893 copies. Irish writers including Kelly and Patricia Scanlan, who have been part of the campaign to get the novel to the top of the charts, reacted with delight.

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Source: gad

Martin Adams: ‘Men are terrible at talking about our health, aren’t we?’

The former darts world champion discusses his battle with prostate cancer and why these days he is as happy to play for free in the local county leagues as on the biggest stage

When you are a professional darts player called ‘Wolfie’, a former three-time world champion still grounded enough to enjoy playing for free in the local leagues, it is obvious why a pub will open just for you before 10 o’clock on a Friday morning. Murky sunlight seeps into The Bell in Deeping St James, not far from Peterborough, as Martin ‘Wolfie’ Adams discusses a silent killer.

“A lot of people call it the silent killer because there are not necessarily any symptoms,” Adams says of prostate cancer, which took hold of him in the spring of 2016. “I didn’t have any symptoms and I know lots of people that have never had any symptoms – or it’s been minor stuff they’ve brushed aside.”

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Source: gad

I want my patients to take control of their healthcare choices | Ranjana Srivastava

We must improve hospital transparency and prompt the riskiest hospitals to lift their game

“You are the cancer doctor? Promise you won’t scare me,” my patient says, clutching my hand. My heart melts. As we slowly navigate the short distance to my office, I worry about his unstable gait.

“I am not here to scare you,” I say gently, “but I hope to help.”

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Source: gad

‘I’m 37, I’m dying and this is how I spend it’

Former recruitment consultant Rob Anderson on how he organises his finances – and why he isn’t keen on bucket lists

I live in the East End of London and own my flat. I have a brain tumour. I’m dying – it’s inoperable, and I’m halfway through my third round of chemo.

I try to live my life to the full, in four-week sprints, with a round of chemo coming up every month.

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Source: gad

We need to do more to close the gap in cancer outcomes | Sanchia Aranda

Money, cultural background and geographic location are crucial in determining survival rates

This week Cancer Council released new data forecasting cancer survival trends into the future. The statistics, outlining an expected 72% increase in the number of Australians living with cancer or in remission by the year 2040, were startling – but even more concerning are the trends that show the gap between the haves and have-nots when it comes to cancer survival.

The new report, released in the lead up to World Cancer Day, held on 4 February, show that when it comes to cancer, things just aren’t as equal as they should be.

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Source: gad

I watched my son die from cancer. Here are the lessons I have learned

Sacha Langton-Gilks has written a book to help other grieving parents

At 6.10am on Tuesday 14 August 2012 my eldest child drew his last breath. I have to look up the time and date because my brain refuses to acknowledge this information, it’s automatically sent to the spam file as dangerous. I find my brain’s attempts at self-protection rather touching in the wholesale carnage that is grief.

The death certificate states who, where, when and why – number nine on the list, cause of death: I (a) medulloblastoma. Medulloblastomas are a group of cancerous brain tumours, the commonest in children, and David, known as DD, was diagnosed with his during October half-term in 2007, aged 11. What his death certificate doesn’t tell you is the quality of his life up to the point of death, his quality of death if you will, because that is a subjective judgment. Many people fortunate enough not to be familiar with death assume all deaths must by definition be “bad”, but as a bereaved granddaughter, daughter and, now, mother, I can tell you that is not true.

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Source: gad