Category Archives: Cancer

We need to do more to close the gap in cancer outcomes | Sanchia Aranda

Money, cultural background and geographic location are crucial in determining survival rates

This week Cancer Council released new data forecasting cancer survival trends into the future. The statistics, outlining an expected 72% increase in the number of Australians living with cancer or in remission by the year 2040, were startling – but even more concerning are the trends that show the gap between the haves and have-nots when it comes to cancer survival.

The new report, released in the lead up to World Cancer Day, held on 4 February, show that when it comes to cancer, things just aren’t as equal as they should be.

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Source: gad

I watched my son die from cancer. Here are the lessons I have learned

Sacha Langton-Gilks has written a book to help other grieving parents

At 6.10am on Tuesday 14 August 2012 my eldest child drew his last breath. I have to look up the time and date because my brain refuses to acknowledge this information, it’s automatically sent to the spam file as dangerous. I find my brain’s attempts at self-protection rather touching in the wholesale carnage that is grief.

The death certificate states who, where, when and why – number nine on the list, cause of death: I (a) medulloblastoma. Medulloblastomas are a group of cancerous brain tumours, the commonest in children, and David, known as DD, was diagnosed with his during October half-term in 2007, aged 11. What his death certificate doesn’t tell you is the quality of his life up to the point of death, his quality of death if you will, because that is a subjective judgment. Many people fortunate enough not to be familiar with death assume all deaths must by definition be “bad”, but as a bereaved granddaughter, daughter and, now, mother, I can tell you that is not true.

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Source: gad

A letter to you and me, five years ago

Looking back on life after our child’s cancer diagnosis: the letter you always wanted to write

It’s New Year’s Eve, and you’re getting ready to pop out and celebrate with friends. You’re not ready for what’s about to happen.

Shortly before midnight, you’ll open the door to an emergency doctor clutching your elder son’s blood test results. She’ll tell you to get him to hospital immediately.

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Source: gad