Category Archives: Business Made Simple with Vodafone

Turn on, scale up, watch out: six simple tech tips for expanding your business

From getting more out of the cloud to switching to business broadband, these six tech moves will help your small business scale up

If you’ve launched a business, you’re a hero. Pat yourself on the back. But now isn’t the time to rest on your laurels – you could turn that start into something bigger. Do you have a plan in place to expand into a new region, win more clients or introduce a hugely successful product line?

If not, read on for a few simple tips to help you plan for growth and set your infrastructure and workflows up for success in the future.

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Source: gad

Quiz: How well do you know business jargon?

Want to get soaked in a thought shower? Know your swim lanes from your sheds? It’s time to get a helicopter view of whether you’re up to speed with today’s business speak by taking our quiz …

Stepping into a business meeting these days, it’s not unusual to feel like people are speaking a different language. There’s a flood of jargon sweeping through our workplaces, yet few translation apps to decipher the strange noises emanating from your colleagues’ mouths. You know they’re using words, but you don’t understand the strange contexts or combinations in which they’re assembled; if you’ve ever attended a seminar with jargonista Connie Taylor, you’ll know what we mean. So do you talk the new business speak? There’s only one way to find out.

If you’re making a “cocktail pitch” you’ll be …

Delivering a proposal so great it knocks your clients out, just like five super-strength old fashioneds.

Dealing with a business pitch that’s gone as sour as a lime margarita.

Giving a succinct, single-sentence summary of your business model.

Sweep the sheds is a euphemism for …

An IPO (initial public offering).

“Our office will be relocating”.

Encouraging employees who aren’t too big for their boots to chip in with humdrum tasks.

If you take a thought shower, you’re actually…

Making a scattershot, free-associating business pitch.

Coming up with a stream of ideas when you least expect to – for example, when you’re jogging, watching Black Mirror, or in the shower.

Just using a new word for “brainstorm”.

Moats are …

Companies that are adept at protecting their profits and market share from rival firms, thereby maintaining a competitive advantage.

A form of economic ringfencing – a way of insulating your business from risky investments.

A pioneering new leadership style named after the autocratic approach of Game of Thrones’ Cersei Lannister.

A “swim lane” is …

A column or row in a flowchart.

A renegade startup that swims against the tide.

A fast-track opportunity for new businesses to “swim” ahead of rivals. Like a business Michael Phelps.

What on earth is a decacorn?

A startup valued at more than $10bn.

A startup with more than 100 employees.

Snapchat’s pioneering new emoji.

Growth hacking involves …

Employing time-saving productivity hacks that free up more time for your business, such as outsourcing upkeep of your social media feeds.

Losing hours in a Buzzfeed or Reddit hole.

Employing innovative, low-cost methods to target as many customers as possible.

We say “snackable”, you say …

“Wellbeing” – as in the free fruit schemes offered by many health-aware offices.

“Workload” – as in Arianna Huffington’s latest brainwave, which suggests employees should only work in short, five-minute bursts – think a corporate version of high-intensity interval training.

“Content” – as in a marketing term describing text or videos consumed in short portions.

If you have “unified comms” you …

Have a strong public relations strategy that everyone in your business adheres to.

Have integrated communications services (think: internet, mobile and fixed-line).

Never accidentally reply with a WhatsApp when someone sent you a message on text.

Plat-ag is short for:

Platform age.

Platform aggressive.

Platform agnostic.

10 and above.

Congratulations! You are disruptive, dynamic and a deep-diving, decacorn-aspiring demon, who likes nothing more than drilling down for some serious blue sky thinking every Monday morning. And you probably live in Palo Alto too. Are we right?

9 and above.

Congratulations! You are disruptive, dynamic and a deep-diving, decacorn-aspiring demon, who likes nothing more than drilling down for some serious blue sky thinking every Monday morning. And you probably live in Palo Alto too. Are we right?

8 and above.

Congratulations! You are disruptive, dynamic and a deep-diving, decacorn-aspiring demon, who likes nothing more than drilling down for some serious blue sky thinking every Monday morning. And you probably live in Palo Alto too. Are we right?

7 and above.

Not bad. You believe there’s no point gibbering on about “synergy” or “annual leave” when “working together” or “holiday” will do, but you know what people who use those words are banging on about. Continue to use a bit of jargonese to impress your way through meetings and you’ll go far.

6 and above.

Not bad. You believe there’s no point gibbering on about “synergy” or “annual leave” when “working together” or “holiday” will do, but you know what people who use those words are banging on about. Continue to use a bit of jargonese to impress your way through meetings and you’ll go far.

5 and above.

Not bad. You believe there’s no point gibbering on about “synergy” or “annual leave” when “working together” or “holiday” will do, but you know what people who use those words are banging on about. Continue to use a bit of jargonese to impress your way through meetings and you’ll go far.

4 and above.

Not bad. You believe there’s no point gibbering on about “synergy” or “annual leave” when “working together” or “holiday” will do, but you know what people who use those words are banging on about. Continue to use a bit of jargonese to impress your way through meetings and you’ll go far.

3 and above.

Admit it, jargon isn’t one of your core competencies. To look that term up, and to upskill the rest of your business parlance, try dipping into Steven Poole’s excellent jargon compendium, Who Touched Base in My Thought Shower? or Valley Speak: Deciphering the Jargon of Silicon Valley (Rochelle Kopp and Steven Ganz).

2 and above.

Admit it, jargon isn’t one of your core competencies. To look that term up, and to upskill the rest of your business parlance, try dipping into Steven Poole’s excellent jargon compendium, Who Touched Base in My Thought Shower? or Valley Speak: Deciphering the Jargon of Silicon Valley (Rochelle Kopp and Steven Ganz).

0 and above.

Admit it, jargon isn’t one of your core competencies. To look that term up, and to upskill the rest of your business parlance, try dipping into Steven Poole’s excellent jargon compendium, Who Touched Base in My Thought Shower? or Valley Speak: Deciphering the Jargon of Silicon Valley (Rochelle Kopp and Steven Ganz).

1 and above.

Admit it, jargon isn’t one of your core competencies. To look that term up, and to upskill the rest of your business parlance, try dipping into Steven Poole’s excellent jargon compendium, Who Touched Base in My Thought Shower? or Valley Speak: Deciphering the Jargon of Silicon Valley (Rochelle Kopp and Steven Ganz).

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Source: gad

Is there a ‘right’ time to launch a new product?

It’s an essential part of growing your business and staying ahead of the competition, but how do you know when to release something new?

1. Decide if and when the market needs your product
The best time to launch a product is when customers are already demanding it. Take a close look at the market – is there a clear need for your product? Have customers told you they would like it, or can you tell from reading comments on social media that it’s something they would value? If so, then this is a brilliant time to launch because you’ll be selling to an enthusiastic audience. And don’t delay, because if you have seen a gap in the market then the chances are your competitors will have seen it too.

2. Launch one product at a time
A launch can involve a lot of hard work to ensure that everything goes smoothly, so stick to one core product at a time and don’t be tempted to adopt a scattergun approach and launch a wide range of items. Launching several innovations at the same time will not only stretch your resources, it will also confuse customers about what your company stands for and where its priorities lie.

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Source: gad

Small business owners share the most important lessons they’ve learned

From harnessing the power of Facebook and FaceTime to raising your own equity, three small business owners give the advice they wish they’d received at the outset

Cyndy Lessing and her business partner Jan Shure launched the online fashion business SoSensational in 2010 to sell clothes for women in their 50s and 60s.

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Source: gad

Social media: 10 ways to market your business even more effectively

Social media can be a brilliant way of helping you connect to your customers, but only if you do it right. Here’s how to really make it work for your business

It’s no good being on social media simply because you feel you ought to be there; you need to have a specific goal in mind. Are you trying to raise awareness, get feedback from customers, drive direct sales, promote a new product?

Understand what you are trying to do
Jordan Stone, head of social media at Vodafone UK, says: “Be clear about what you are using social media for. There is no single way, but you need to define what you want to achieve and then really focus on a plan.

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Source: gad