Category Archives: Birds

Artist Tracey Emin sends in the bronze birds to slow Sydney down

The artwork – 70 birds on lamp-posts and window sills – stretches down CBD streets and ends at a big stone bird bath

The acclaimed British artist Tracey Emin has perched almost 70 life-size bronze birds on lamp-posts, awnings and window sills along a busy pedestrian thoroughfare in Sydney’s business district.

She hopes the permanent public artwork, commissioned by the City of Sydney, will slow life down for just a moment for those who notice the small sculptures.

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Source: gad

Saving the albatross: 'The war is against plastic and they are casualties on the frontline'

Following his shocking photographs of dead albatross chicks and the diet of plastic that killed them, Chris Jordan’s new film is a call to action to repair our broken relationship with planet Earth

We are living in a plastic age and the solutions may seem glaringly obvious, so why aren’t all 7.6 billion of us already doing things differently? Shocking statistics don’t guarantee effective change. So what’s the alternative? American photographer and filmmaker Chris Jordan believes the focus should be on forcing people to have a stronger emotional engagement with the problems plastic causes. His famous photographs of dead albatross chicks and the colourful plastic they have ingested serve as a blunt reminder that the planet is in a state of emergency.

While making his feature-length film Albatross, Jordan considered Picasso’s approach: “The role of the artist is to respect you, help you connect more deeply, and then leave it up to you to decide how to behave.”

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Source: gad

Two become one: two raven lineages merge in 'speciation reversal'

After up to two million years of separate evolution, two types of common raven have been ‘caught in the act’ of consolidation, say scientists

Speciation, where one species diverges into two, is a well-known concept in the theory of evolution. But a new study based on almost 20 years of research has revealed that “speciation reversal”, the merging of two previously distinct lineages, may also play an important role.

Scientists have discovered that two lineages of common raven that spent between one and two million years evolving separately appear to be in the process of such a consolidation. The findings raise intriguing questions about how science should define species – and whether the boundaries are as clearcut as once thought.

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Source: gad

One million birds killed illegally every year at a wildlife site in Iran

Conservationists sound alarm over unprecedented slaughter of rare and endangered species by hunters at three lagoons

A million wild birds a year are now being killed illegally at a single wildlife site in Iran. That is the stark warning from conservationists who say highly endangered migratory species face being wiped out in the near future there unless urgent action is taken.

In a letter last week to the journal Science, the conservationists pinpoint the Fereydunkenar wetlands in Iran as the site of this widespread wildlife slaughter.

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Source: gad

Talking animals: we aren’t the only species capable of speech …

Ongoing studies show that some mammals and birds can mimic the sound of the human voice

Research published last month proved that orca, or killer, whales have the ability to mimic the complexities of human speech. Josep Call, professor in evolutionary origins of mind at the University of St Andrews, was a co-author of the study. He said: “I think here we have the first evidence that killer whales may be learning sounds by vocal imitation.”

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Source: gadt

Nigel the lonely gannet surrounded by concrete birds on Mana Island – video

Nigel the lonely gannet, who spent much of his time surrounded by concrete birds on Mana island, has died. Conservation officers lured Nigel to the island off New Zealand with the imitation gannets in the hope of encouraging a colony to settle on the reserve

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Source: gad

Nigel the lonely gannet dies as he lived, surrounded by concrete birds

New Zealand conservationists mourn loss of celebrated bird that was lured by replica gannets in the hope of establishing a breeding colony

If there is such a thing as a tragic life for a bird, then the life of Nigel “no mates”, a New Zealand gannet, probably fits that bill.

Nigel lived for years on his own on uninhabited Mana Island off the north of the country, surrounded by concrete replica gannets.

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Source: gad