Category Archives: Baking

Tamal Ray’s banana, date and cherry muffins | The sweet spot

Banana bread isn’t the only recipe for using up overripe bananas

If you’ve grown tired of banana bread, these versatile mini-bakes are another way to use up any overripe bananas you might have lying around. Dates and cherries are my go-to dried fruits here, but prunes and dried apricots would also work well; experiment with any fruits you prefer.

Prep 10 min
Cooking 12 min
Makes 12

Continue reading…
Source: gad

Ruby Tandoh’s recipe for milk cakes with raspberry and rose curd | The sweet spot

You haven’t really known cake until you’ve had it steamed – crumby, moist and light as a feather

You haven’t really known cake until you’ve had it steamed. There’s a Chinese restaurant in Sheffield where you can get hulking portions of Malaysian steamed sponge cake: firm, featherweight, cakey and moist, all at once. These milk cakes are a riff on that; raspberry curd adds sharp-sweetness and the granola gives bite. You’ll need silicone muffin cases to make them.

Continue reading…
Source: gad

Ruby Tandoh’s recipe for cherry blondies with bay cream | The Sweet Spot

Beautify your brownies with these grown-up blondies spiced up with citrus and cherries

Usually I like to take a recipe straight to its basest form: opera cake? Make that a chocolate sponge. Towering croquembouche? Serve ‘em a nice eclair instead. These blondies are unusual for me, then, because for once I’ve taken something a bit saccharine and naff and made it classier. Brought to life with citrussy cardamom and plump cherries, these avoid the cloying sweetness of traditional blondies, while the bay-infused cream adds a subtle aniseed warmth. They might only be brownies with a wig on, but they taste a million bucks.

Prep 20 mins
Cook 30-35 mins
Serves 12

Continue reading…
Source: gad

Tamal Ray’s recipe for scones with green kiwi fruit jam

An unconventional, tart jam is just the thing to spread liberally on warm, homemade scones

The humble kiwi fruit occupies an unfairly neglected position in the minds of most home cooks. Before a 20th-century rebranding by savvy New Zealand farmers, it was known as the Chinese gooseberry, but beyond the tartness of flavour and the acid-green flesh, the comparison to gooseberries might seem a bit far-fetched. Once cooked down into a jam, however, the taste is uncannily familiar. Perfect for a batch of scones fresh from the oven.

This is one of the easiest jams I’ve ever made. I’d usually rely on my trusty kitchen thermometer to reassure me that it has reached the correct temperature to set properly, but that’s currently out of action, so I had to rely on more traditional methods instead. The combination of fruits are so full of pectin (responsible for the jelly-ish consistency of jam) that it’s virtually impossible to undercook. Your efforts will be rewarded with a deliciously tart jam, speckled attractively with little black seeds.

Continue reading…
Source: gad

Homemade granola recipe | Felicity Cloake’s masterclass

Step away from the cereal aisle: granola is absurdly easy to make, and at a fraction of the cost of the packet stuff

If I could go back in time, I’d invest in granola shares: this mix of grains, fruit and nuts often costs more per kilo than steak. Not only is it cheap and stupidly easy to make at home, but you can put exactly what you like in it, too. Not a fan of raisins? Bin them. Mad on macadamia nuts? Chuck in a whole bag. Bespoke breakfast bliss.

Continue reading…
Source: gad

The perfect … Sussex pond pudding | Felicity Cloake

Bright and zingy, yet warm and comforting, this suety, syrupy pudding is British stodge at its very best

Part of the honourable tradition of British dishes with names to pique the interest more than the appetite (see also toad in the hole, spotted dick and cock-a-leekie), the Sussex pond pudding is sometimes claimed to be named for the dew ponds that pepper the South Downs – though what thirsty cattle would make of the lemon syrup that fills this particular pond is anyone’s guess.

Continue reading…
Source: gad

Nigel Slater’s desert island dishes

To celebrate 200 issues of Observer Food Monthly, Nigel Slater revisits and updates 10 of his all-time favourite dishes, including roast lamb and couscous, scallops with yuzu and apple bread and butter pudding

The recipes that appear in my column in OFM have always mirrored what I eat at home. They start their life around the kitchen table. An idea. A possibility. A whim. Something I have made to eat at home that I feel is worth developing and sharing. There are no test kitchens and teams of home economists and chefs here. Everything comes from my home kitchen. That said, I don’t work alone. James Thompson has worked on the recipes with me for almost a decade. Jonathan Lovekin has photographed them for even longer. After cooking and shooting, the three of us sit down and eat.

I started, enthusiastically, picking my favourite recipes from the last 200 issues. A task that soon found me frustrated at having to leave out so many much-loved recipes. (At one point it was pretty much a collection of pork recipes.) Like choosing your desert island discs, it becomes easier to choose by making a list, closing your eyes and sticking a pin in it.

Continue reading…
Source: gad

Novel recipes: Italian chocolate cake from Call Me By Your Name

André Aciman’s novel, set during one listless summer on the Italian Riviera, inspires Kate to make a cake that’ll suit bakers working in hot or cold weather

  • Scroll down for the recipe

When I looked at my dessert plate and saw the chocolate cake speckled with raspberry juice, it seemed to me that someone was pouring more and more red sauce than usual…

Call Me By Your Name, André Aciman

Continue reading…
Source: gad