Category Archives: Airline industry

Aviation agencies order engine checks after Southwest blast

US and European regulators order inspections within 20 days after passenger killed by blowout

US and European airline regulators have ordered emergency inspections within 20 days of nearly 700 aircraft engines similar to the one involved in a fatal Southwest Airlines blowout earlier this week, citing risks of a similar mishap.

The directives from the US Federal Aviation Administration and the European Aviation Safety Agency indicated rising concerns since a similar failure in 2016 of the same type of engine – a CFM56-7B engine, made by CFM International.

Continue reading…
Source: gad

Businesses face unanswered questions a year from Brexit – sector by sector analysis

With a year to go, Dan Roberts takes a look at the unresolved issues forcing firms to take evasive action

With only a year to go until Britain leaves the EU, a mounting backlog of unresolved problems is causing business to take evasive action – despite government attempts to buy more time with a transition deal.

More than half of large companies have already put emergency contingency plans into action, according to a survey, and in key sectors such as insurance and transport there are warnings of higher prices and disruption for customers if the fragile truce breaks down.

Continue reading…
Source: gad

My 17-hour Qantas odyssey in kangaroo pyjamas

The airline has made history with its first non-stop flight from Australia to the UK. Here’s what it was like to be on board

This is the story of a flight. But it starts with a few caveats. Firstly, it is not a normal flight – the passengers are not your average travellers as they include ministers, CEOs and more journalists than politicians would normally be comfortable sharing a small space with.

Secondly, it is not your average payload – the luggage includes cameras, tripods and special pyjamas – and it is a history-making flight. The first to connect Australia and the UK, non-stop. And, thirdly, your Guardian correspondent doesn’t normally fly business class – so this is a dose of unreality.

Continue reading…
Source: gad

Calais 'could be 10 times worse than Irish border' after Brexit

Boss of French port says customs and sanitary checks could lead to 30-mile tailbacks

The boss of the port of Calais has said there could be tailbacks up to 30 miles in all directions and potential food shortages in Britain if a Brexit deal involves mandatory customs and sanitary checks at the French ferry terminal.

Jean-Marc Puissesseau made an impassioned plea to Theresa May and Michel Barnier to put plans in place immediately to avert congestion in Calais and Dover, where bosses have already warned of permanent 20-mile tailbacks.

Continue reading…
Source: gad

Why was I punished by easyJet for someone else’s crime?

Tha airline blacklisted me because a fraudster made payments for flights with my card four years ago

In June 2014 I reported to my bank fraudulent use on my credit card, which, among other things, related to £2,000-worth of dental treatment and flights purchased with Ryanair and easyJet. This money was immediately refunded to my card and, to this date, my card remains in use without any problems. Since then, I have bought and used Ryanair flights without any issue. But I have recently tried to purchase a flight with easyJet and each time my card gets refunded automatically. It has now confirmed that I am effectively blacklisted due to the fraud four years ago, even though it had nothing to do with me. The only way I can fly with easyJet is if I pay in cash at the terminal. I am a law-abiding citizen with an impeccable credit history and am being punished for someone else’s offence.

RD, Birmingham

Continue reading…
Source: gad

Inequality at 30,000 feet: is aviation the least progressive industry?

Australian firm Qantas is encouraging staff to be more aware of gender and diversity, but sexist dress-codes and vast pay gaps are still airline staples

Here is a question that has probably never crossed your mind: how woke is aviation? Never, that is, until now. A “political-correctness row” has reportedly errupted at the Australian airline Qantas, whose staff have been advised of language that is more respectful of the LGBTI community and others, as part of a “Spirit of Inclusion” month.

According to reports, an “information booklet” instructed male employees to avoid “manterrupting” – cutting off female colleagues – and told all staff to say “partner” rather than husband or wife, because “language can make groups of people invisible. For example, the use of the term chairman can reinforce the idea that leaders are always men.” The “booklet” also warned against unconscious colonialist bias when discussing Australian history.

Continue reading…
Source: gad

Air taxis: we have lift-off…

Individual journeys by air – to work, to the airport, between cities – may feature in the not-too-distant future

Last month Airbus released a video of the first successful test flight of its electric vertical take-off and landing (eVTOL) autonomous drone. Although it only hovered in the air for 53 seconds, the fact that its eight rotors were powered entirely by electricity was a landmark for the manufacturer of gas-guzzling planes. The goal is that the technology could be used for airborne travel in congested cities. “Our goal is to democratise personal flight by leveraging the latest technologies such as electric propulsion, energy storage and machine vision,” blogged Zach Lovering, Vahana project executive.

Continue reading…
Source: gadt

Why did easyJet cancel our booking … but fail to tell us?

If we had turned up we would have been denied boarding – I’d like to know if I can make a claim

In December I booked an easyJet flight for my girlfriend from Agadir, Morocco back to London (Gatwick) and, because it was less than 30 days before departure, we checked her in and printed the boarding pass.

The day before her travel I noticed, by chance, that the money had been refunded to the credit card and I became suspicious. The easyJet website showed no booking.

Continue reading…
Source: gad

Ryanair: passengers fight for expenses if flights are delayed

Solicitor says dodging legitimate claims are not ‘isolated incident’ but ‘company policy’

When Linda Fisher booked a three-day break in Berlin to visit her boyfriend last August, Ryanair was the cheapest option. But she has paid a high price for choosing the budget airline. The flight took off late at night after a delay of just under three hours and, half an hour before it was due to land at Berlin Schönefeld, passengers were told that they were being diverted to Hanover. Noise restrictions meant that flights could not land at Schönefeld after midnight, a fact the crew would have known at take-off. If she had been informed in time, Fisher says, she would not have boarded. Buses were promised to take the passengers on the three-hour journey to their original destination. However, when they reached Hanover at 1am there was no transport in sight and no staff to direct them.

“Our only option was to get a taxi costing €500, or to rush from the airport on the last train to Hanover Central and then to get the overnight train from there to Berlin,” she says.

Continue reading…
Source: gad