Category Archives: Air transport

'Nut rage': Korean Air boss apologises as daughters resign

Cho Yang-ho sorry for ‘immature actions’ including disruption on flight in 2014 over a bag of nuts

The chair of Korean Air, Cho Yang-ho, has apologised for what he called the immature behaviour of his two daughters and said they would both immediately resign from their company posts following separate controversies.

Cho Hyun-min, the younger daughter, who is a marketing executive at the South Korean flag carrier, is under police investigation for assault after she was accused of throwing water in a man’s face at a business meeting.

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Source: gad

Tammie Jo Shults was a hero long before she saved lives of 148 people | Rebecca Nicholson

If Julia Roberts isn’t already on the phone about playing her in a movie, I’d be amazed

After one of its engines appeared to explode in midair, a flight from New York to Dallas ended terribly and tragically with the death of a passenger, Jennifer Riordan, who had been partially sucked out of a broken window. The horror is unimaginable.

It’s the nightmarish worst-case scenario that is never supposed to happen, the stuff of disaster movies, not real life. But the pilot of Southwest Airlines flight 1380, Captain Tammie Jo Shults, landed the plane calmly and successfully, on just one engine, at a Philadelphia airport, saving the lives of 148 people. Riordan’s death was awful; the fact that the incident wasn’t even more deadly was extraordinary.

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Source: gad

Aviation agencies order engine checks after Southwest blast

US and European regulators order inspections within 20 days after passenger killed by blowout

US and European airline regulators have ordered emergency inspections within 20 days of nearly 700 aircraft engines similar to the one involved in a fatal Southwest Airlines blowout earlier this week, citing risks of a similar mishap.

The directives from the US Federal Aviation Administration and the European Aviation Safety Agency indicated rising concerns since a similar failure in 2016 of the same type of engine – a CFM56-7B engine, made by CFM International.

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Source: gad

Southwest explosion: aviation authority orders mass engine inspections

Directive requires ultrasonic inspection of fan blades on CFM56-7B engines that accrued certain number of flights

The US Federal Aviation Administration has ordered the inspection of 220 jet engines after investigators said a broken fan blade touched off an engine explosion on a Southwest Airlines flight, shattering a window and killing a passenger.

The order, called an air-worthiness directive, would require an ultrasonic inspection within the next six months of the fan blades on all CFM56-7B engines that have accrued a certain number of flights.

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Source: gad

How to survive an ultra-long haul flight

Qantas has completed its first non-stop flight from Australia to the UK. But what’s the best way to cope with 17 hours in an economy cabin?

Ultra-long haul is the new long-haul. Yesterday, Qantas completed its first non-stop flight from Perth, Australia, to Heathrow – 9,240 miles – in just over 17 hours.

It’s a remarkably long time to be crammed into an airline seat. It’s also potentially dangerous, as being immobile for prolonged periods can lead to blood clots forming in your legs.

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Source: gad

My 17-hour Qantas odyssey in kangaroo pyjamas

The airline has made history with its first non-stop flight from Australia to the UK. Here’s what it was like to be on board

This is the story of a flight. But it starts with a few caveats. Firstly, it is not a normal flight – the passengers are not your average travellers as they include ministers, CEOs and more journalists than politicians would normally be comfortable sharing a small space with.

Secondly, it is not your average payload – the luggage includes cameras, tripods and special pyjamas – and it is a history-making flight. The first to connect Australia and the UK, non-stop. And, thirdly, your Guardian correspondent doesn’t normally fly business class – so this is a dose of unreality.

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Source: gad

All that litters? Tonnes of gold strewn across runway after falling out of Russian plane

Bars of precious metals scattered after door of Antonov cargo plane opened during take-off from airport in Siberia

A Russian plane loaded with precious metals lost its glittering cargo on take-off Thursday, scattering the runway with gold and silver.

The Antonov plane was taking off after refuelling in an airport at Yakutsk in Siberia when its cargo door flew open – and out tumbled nearly 200 bars from the Kupol gold mine in the remote Chukotka region, investigators said.

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Source: gad

Bangladeshi plane with 71 on board crashes in Nepal

At least 38 killed, police say, after US-Bangla Airlines plane slips off runway as it lands at Kathmandu airport

A Bangladeshi aircraft carrying 67 passengers and four crew members has crashed as it was landing at Kathmandu airport in Nepal.

The US-Bangla Airlines plane slipped off the runway as it was landing and fell down a slope, sliding for about 300 metres before it stopped at a football pitch, leaving a trail of twisted metal, paper and luggage along the burnt grass.

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Source: gad

New York helicopter crash: five dead after aircraft ditches in East river

Pilot rescued but all passengers perish after Eurocopter AS350 comes down in Manhattan waterway

Five people have died after a helicopter crashed into New York’s East river on Sunday night and flipped upside down in the water.

Video taken by a bystander and posted on Twitter showed the red helicopter land and then capsize, its rotor blades slapping at the water.

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Source: gad

Air taxis: we have lift-off…

Individual journeys by air – to work, to the airport, between cities – may feature in the not-too-distant future

Last month Airbus released a video of the first successful test flight of its electric vertical take-off and landing (eVTOL) autonomous drone. Although it only hovered in the air for 53 seconds, the fact that its eight rotors were powered entirely by electricity was a landmark for the manufacturer of gas-guzzling planes. The goal is that the technology could be used for airborne travel in congested cities. “Our goal is to democratise personal flight by leveraging the latest technologies such as electric propulsion, energy storage and machine vision,” blogged Zach Lovering, Vahana project executive.

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Source: gadt