Category Archives: Aid

David Cameron: I’m proud I championed aid. But we must rethink how we do it

In fragile states, resolving disputes and building institutions should take priority over a rush to hold elections

Cutting extreme poverty in half is one of the greatest achievements of our lifetimes. Vaccinations have saved seven million lives since the turn of the century; over two billion more people been given have access to clean drinking water; 43 million more children go to school; HIV-related deaths have nearly halved in just 15 years. Be in no doubt: market economics, supported by overseas aid, works.

But with nearly 900 million people still living on less than $2 a day, the battle against global poverty isn’t over. And, while growth in countries such as China and India is lifting millions out of poverty, in too many of the world’s poorest countries, progress is completely stuck.

Continue reading…
Source: gad

'Why we’re paying the rent for a million Syrian refugees'

European cash assistance schemes are helping Turkey manage millions of refugees. In return, the country is expected to stop migrants coming west. But the deal is too one-sided, say the Turkish authorities

At a supermarket in Gaziantep, Huda is shopping for eggs, rice and bread to feed her four children. She is using the money left over after paying the rent.

A Syrian refugee in Turkey, she no longer has to queue for food handouts or at soup kitchens. Huda now has her own debit card loaded with funds as part of a European-funded unconditional cash transfer programme.

Continue reading…
Source: gad

'A national disgrace': fury over £100m aid deal between UK and Saudi Arabia

Unveiling of plan to create infrastructure in poor countries overshadowed by unease over Saudi role in Yemen conflict

The announcement of a controversial aid deal between the UK and Saudi Arabia has been branded a “national disgrace”.

Amid further outcry over Britain’s relationship with the Gulf state, government ministers have signed a £100m aid agreement with Riyadh to coincide with Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s visit to London this week.

Continue reading…
Source: gad

Syria aid deliveries halted amid reports of chemical attacks

More than 90 people were killed overnight and dozens more hurt in eastern Ghouta, monitor says

Doctors and rescue workers in the besieged Syrian region of eastern Ghouta have said are struggling to cope with another intense bout of what they described as “insane” violence, in which more than 90 people were killed overnight, according to war monitors.

The airstrikes and shelling of the enclave near Damascus led to the postponement of aid deliveries to more than 300,000 people under siege, amid military advances by forces loyal to the regime of Bashar al-Assad.

Continue reading…
Source: gad

Dozens killed in single day in Syrian enclave of eastern Ghouta

Deadliest 24-hours for besieged civilians since UN security council demanded ceasefire

At least 77 people have been killed in the besieged Syrian enclave of eastern Ghouta on Monday – the deadliest day for civilians there since the UN security council demanded an immediate ceasefire and Russia’s president ordered a daily five-hour truce in the area.

A further 12 people were killed on Sunday but their bodies were only recovered on Monday, doctors said.

Continue reading…
Source: gad

'By Ethiopians, for Ethiopians': girl band Yegna shake off Spice Girls tag | Claudine Spera

A group that supports women’s rights using music influenced by Ethiopian heritage is thriving – despite losing UK aid funding

In the grounds of a school in Bahir Dar, a city in north-west Ethiopia, thousands of young fans have gathered to catch a glimpse of the country’s hottest girl band.

Behind billowing white sheets in a makeshift green room, the four women collectively known as Yegna prepare to take the stage. As the harsh lunchtime sunshine beats down, curious schoolchildren press up against the material to get a glimpse of their idols, who have been dubbed Ethiopia’s Spice Girls by the British press.

Continue reading…
Source: gad

Saudi plan to allay Yemen suffering branded 'a cynical PR exercise'

Critics say $3.5bn humanitarian operations scheme would further limit access to 8 million people on the verge of starvation

A much vaunted Saudi plan to relieve the humanitarian catastrophe in Yemen has been branded a tactic of war and a “cynical PR exercise”.

Riyadh announced its $3.5bn (£2.5bn) Yemen Comprehensive Humanitarian Operations plan in January, following months of criticism over the effect of a blockade that has left an estimated 8 million people facing acute malnutrition in a country where 75% of the population of 29 million are in need of aid.

Continue reading…
Source: gad

Save the Children official fired for historical child safeguarding concerns

Charity admits major failings in hiring practices after employing worker for two decades

Save the Children has admitted to major failings in its employment procedures after it emerged that a senior official worked at the charity for more than two decades before he was fired over historical child safeguarding concerns.

Rudolph von Bernuth, who held senior posts including that of international programmes director, was at Save the Children from 1992-96 and 1997-2014 before he was sacked for serious misconduct linked to past offences. He has since been a university guest lecturer in the US.

Continue reading…
Source: gad

I train organic farmers in Ethiopia and they depend on charities’ support | Tadesse Amera

Cotton farmers would still use pesticides if it weren’t for UK donations that we hope won’t dry up because of sex scandals

Among crops, cotton is notorious for the high volumes of hazardous pesticides used to grow it. Pesticide poisoning of smallholder farmers is all too common and indiscriminate use is a major cause of water pollution and biodiversity loss. For years, the accepted wisdom around the world has been that it is uneconomical to grow cotton in any other way. But today farmers in Ethiopia are proving that it is not only possible, but profitable, to grow cotton without pesticides.

I work with smallholder cotton farmers in the Arba Minch area in the south of the country. In the early 2000s they benefited from some training on sustainable agriculture and, despite having no funding, were very keen to continue. Many had suffered from pesticide poisoning themselves or had witnessed the suffering of family or friends. The high cost of pesticides, coupled with dwindling profits, was having an adverse effect on family incomes. They were motivated to find safer and cheaper methods of cotton production.

Continue reading…
Source: gad

Aid agencies 'complicit in exploitation of most vulnerable', says Mordaunt

International development secretary calls on humanitarian groups to deliver on promises to the world’s poor

The international development secretary said the “grotesque” sexual exploitation of the most vulnerable by aid workers was caused by Britain’s failure in its duty to put aid beneficiaries first.

The scandal has shown that aid organisations have become complicit in the exploitation of people they were supposed to help, Penny Mordaunt said.

Continue reading…
Source: gad