Category Archives: Advertising

War and pleas: propaganda posters from 20th century Australia – in pictures

Posters played a crucial role in the wars of the 20th century, firing up patriotic sentiment and sending out calls to arms. The exhibition Propaganda draws on the Australian War Memorial’s extensive collection, showing how illustration and graphic design were used to speak directly to people during times of conflict

Propaganda runs at the Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery 20 April – 8 July

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Source: gad

What happens to the global publicity titans if advertising no longer pays?

The departure of Martin Sorrell from WPP is just the latest sign of the crisis surrounding big ad firms and their ageing leaders

Not so long ago a bearish Sir Martin Sorrell berated the advertising industry for its unrealistic “Don Draperish optimism” in the face of tough times, in a reference to hit TV series Mad Men and its depiction of the halcyon days and excesses of 1960s adland. Now it is the next generation, of Sorrell and his “math men” – the builders of global empires designed to churn out profits – that is now perhaps on the brink of becoming history.

Sorrell’s departure may have been prompted by an investigation into allegations of personal misconduct, but with WPP’s share price down a third after a disastrous year, questions were already being raised about whether the 73-year-old’s vision was outdated in modern advertising.

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Source: gad

What’s the best email service that doesn’t scan emails for ad-targeting?

Jim doesn’t want his emails scanned for targeted ads, but while there are ways to avoid it, surveillance-based advertising is rife

What’s the best free email service provider that does not scan or use the data in your emails for advertising? Jim

Free email services are usually paid for by showing you advertisements. Some email services scan your emails in order to show you personalised or targeted ads. You could argue that that’s a benefit, because you’ll see ads in which you might have some interest. You could also argue that your emails are private, so it’s an invasion of privacy. Either way, it’s different from scanning your emails to stop viruses and phishing attempts, which nobody wants to stop.

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Source: gadt

Facebook to start asking permission for facial recognition in GDPR push

Users will be asked to review information about targeted advertising but some say opting out is deliberately difficult

Facebook has started to seek explicit consent from users for targeted advertising, storage of sensitive information, and – for the first time in the EU – application of facial recognition technology as the European general data protection regulation (GDPR) is due to come into force in just over a month.

The company is only required to seek the new permissions in the European Union, but it plans to roll them out to all Facebook users, no matter where they live. The move follows Mark Zuckerberg’s stated goal to apply the spirit of GDPR worldwide.

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Source: gadt

Did Facebook read my private emails? | Letters

At a time of great emotional pain, Charlotte Soares was confronted by pop-up adverts on Facebook for funeral organisers

The news reminds me why I stopped using Facebook (Report, 22 March). Back in 2015-16 my mother was dying and I only used my BT email when writing to family and friends about her, never mentioning her on Facebook, the only social media I used. Suddenly I started getting pop-up adverts on Facebook for funeral organisers, will writers and monumental masons. At a time of great emotional pain, I was confronted by this every time I went on to Facebook like a slap in the face. I complained to BT that it seemed my emails were being compromised, when I thought what I wrote in them was private. They said it should be and they would investigate but I heard no more.

I tried to contact Facebook to complain about inappropriate advertising which, to me, was of an emotionally abusive nature, but could find no working contact details. It left me no alternative but to come off Facebook because I could no longer trust the site. My main worry was the link between what I wrote in emails and what appeared on Facebook. I tested it by sending an email saying I was thinking of going to Italy. Hey presto, up came an advert on Facebook for Alitalia. It felt like an invasion of my privacy even if it’s only computers talking to each other with no humans aware. To use my mother’s final illness as a means to persuade me to buy things is inappropriate and caused me immense distress.

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Source: gadt

Bank of America hiring brand safety officer to 'clean up' online ads

New role created after fears about questionable content, following Unilever’s public stand against ‘fake news, racism, sexism and hate’

Bank of America is to hire a “brand safety officer”, a full-time job dedicated to ensuring that the company’s advertising doesn’t appear alongside questionable content online.

The new role, announced at the MWC conference in Barcelona, comes weeks after Unilever threatened to pull adverts entirely from Facebook and Google.

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Source: gadt

Can we really trust Google as judge, jury and executioner of online ads?

With cries of undue influence over the industry body deciding which ads to ban, is new Chrome adblocking too self-serving?

From today, users of Google Chrome, the most popular web browser in the world, will no longer see 12 types of online adverts which have been deemed to be “intrusive” by a group of advertising industry members

Leading that body, which examined 104 potential formats to determine which should be blocked and which should be allowed, is the world’s largest digital advertiser: Google.

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Source: gadt

Google turns on default adblocker within Chrome

Users of latest Chrome browser on Windows, Mac OS, Linux and Android will have some of most intrusive types of ads blocked automatically

Google will start automatically blocking intrusive ads within its Chrome browser for desktop and Android from Thursday 15 February.

The change, announced in June, will see the dominant browser that is used by over 56% of internet users block some of the most intrusive ads including full-page prestitial ads, flashing animated ads and auto-playing video ads with sound.

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Source: gadt

Hey Alexa, is it true a TV advert made Amazon Echo order cat food?

Advertising watchdog rejects Echo Dot owner’s complaint that TV spot was irresponsible

An Amazon Echo owner has tried to get a television advertising campaign for the smart speaker banned after the Alexa virtual assistant attempted to order cat food when it heard its name on an ad.

An Amazon TV ad for the Echo Dot, which can perform functions such as make shopping lists and play music with voice commands, features people using the device in different situations. In one a man’s voice says: “Alexa, reorder Purina cat food.” Alexa responds: “I’ve found Purina cat food. Would you like to buy it?”

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Source: gadt